Dakota Student

Women’s March on Washington

Kyle Thorson, owner of Archives Coffee Shop, speaks during the raise your cups event Saturday morning on-campus. Daniel Yun/ Dakota Student

Daniel Yun

Kyle Thorson, owner of Archives Coffee Shop, speaks during the raise your cups event Saturday morning on-campus. Daniel Yun/ Dakota Student

Liz Kacher, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






A large crowd of students gathered together at Archives Coffee House Saturday, Jan. 21, in support of the Women’s March on Washington that occurred in D.C. The Women’s March on Washington intended to send a message to the Trump administration that women’s rights are human rights.

Archives hosted the informal group of women who gathered together to share their concerns and fears surrounding the presidency of Donald Trump, as well as possible ways to move toward a positive future for all.

The fears and concerns of audience members were validated by others who shared their concerns. Following the speaker’s remarks, audience members were given the opportunity to ask questions and provide input as to how the community could move forward.

The mission statement on the Women’s March on Washington website states, “We stand together in solidarity with our partners and children for the protection of our rights, our safety, our health, and our families – recognizing that our vibrant and diverse communities are the strength of our country.”

The event at Archives brought that vision statement home to the Grand Forks community. The organizers of the event gave attendees the chance to gather and connect over an important issue they are passionate about.

Attendees lifted their coffee cups to American ideals that are still attainable. Women were scheduled to share what they value most about the country, and what they intend to protect.

Senior Noel Lugo was part of the audience at Archives, and she spoke with The Dakota Student about her decision to attend the event.

“I went because I thought it would be a good idea to be around other people who were shaken and concerned by the inauguration.””

— Noel Lugo

Lugo spoke about the atmosphere of the event and how participants concerns were validated.

“It was so positive,” Lugo said. “It wasn’t a place to complain or to be angry.”

Women gathered to listen, to take action and to be active participants in democracy. The point of the event was not debate or complain, it was to speak honestly about concerns and fears audience members had about the nation’s future.

Lugo said this event was more about making an action plan for the future rather than a call to action. The Women’s March on Washington is largely focused on unity for all members of society.

The national event is committed to creating a society where black, native, poor, immigrant, disabled, Muslim, lesbian, queer and trans women are able to live free and healthy lives that aren’t impeded by an unequal society.

Speakers stressed the importance of taking action here and now. The Women’s March on Washington intends to be a first step toward unifying communities from the grassroots up. Taking action on a local level is starting point when it comes to social change.

The substantial turnout of the Raise Your Cups event showed how members of our community are committed to pursue unity amongst all members of society.

Lugo is enthusiastic about the future of the Raise Your Cups event.

“I’m really excited to see the energy at the Raise Your Cup event carry through over the next four years right here in the local Grand Forks community,” Lugo said.

The optimistic atmosphere at the Raise Your Cups event showed how our community is committed to a positive future for all.

Liz Kacher is a staff writer for The Dakota Student. She can be reached at [email protected]

Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Navigate Left
  • Women’s March on Washington

    Alley Stroh

    The year in review

  • Women’s March on Washington

    Daniel Yun

    Feast of Nations

  • Women’s March on Washington

    Daniel Yun

    Invisible slaves

  • Women’s March on Washington

    Arts&Comm

    Adelphi fountain, a symbol for UND

  • Women’s March on Washington

    Arts&Comm

    Great traditions carried out

  • Women’s March on Washington

    Daniel Yun

    Women’s Volleyball snagging wins down south

  • Women’s March on Washington

    Arts&Comm

    Shedding light on UND’s Hisshou karate

  • Women’s March on Washington

    Grand forks

    Is the driving age too young?

  • Women’s March on Washington

    madison overby

    Softball takes down Jackrabbits

  • Women’s March on Washington

    News

    New Student Leadership

Navigate Right

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






The student news site of University of North Dakota
Women’s March on Washington